Posts tagged public radio

This exists. Ari Shapiro by Richard Gerst

This exists. Ari Shapiro by Richard Gerst

University of New Orleans, NPR to announce nonprofit news operation

The University of New Orleans and its NPR affiliate are announcing today the formation of NewOrleansReporter.org, a nonprofit news operation run by 10 to 20 news producers and funded by up to $2 million in annual memberships.

theparisreview:

“You still have to do your work. I write for a radio show that, no matter what, will go on the air Saturday at five o’clock central time. You learn to write toward that deadline, to let the adrenaline pick you up on Friday morning and carry you through, to cook up a monologue about Lake Wobegon and get to the theater on time. That can be pleasurable, but only if the material you write is good. If it’s not, you’re filled with self-loathing. If the material is good and funny, you still loathe yourself, of course, for writing comedy and lighthearted fluff instead of writing serious and loathsome fiction, but … What was your question?”
—Garrison Keillor, The Art of Humor No. 2

My question was, “When are you retiring again?”

theparisreview:

“You still have to do your work. I write for a radio show that, no matter what, will go on the air Saturday at five o’clock central time. You learn to write toward that deadline, to let the adrenaline pick you up on Friday morning and carry you through, to cook up a monologue about Lake Wobegon and get to the theater on time. That can be pleasurable, but only if the material you write is good. If it’s not, you’re filled with self-loathing. If the material is good and funny, you still loathe yourself, of course, for writing comedy and lighthearted fluff instead of writing serious and loathsome fiction, but … What was your question?”

Garrison Keillor, The Art of Humor No. 2

My question was, “When are you retiring again?”

The Mix: 100 Essential Noise Pop Songs
This is so seriously great. I totally forgot about Folk Implosion.

The Mix: 100 Essential Noise Pop Songs

This is so seriously great. I totally forgot about Folk Implosion.

Andrea Seabrook is leaving NPR. And her next step sounds intriguing.

Washington is broken. You are not.
DecodeDC is for smart, engaged, and busy people like you. Through the podcast and blog, DecodeDC will decipher Washington’s Byzantine language and procedure, sweeping away what doesn’t matter so you can focus on what does.
DecodeDC goes live on July 27, 2012.

Andrea Seabrook is leaving NPR. And her next step sounds intriguing.

Washington is broken. You are not.

DecodeDC is for smart, engaged, and busy people like you. Through the podcast and blog, DecodeDC will decipher Washington’s Byzantine language and procedure, sweeping away what doesn’t matter so you can focus on what does.

DecodeDC goes live on July 27, 2012.

RadioLab’s new iPhone app. Absolutely stunning.

RadioLab’s new iPhone app. Absolutely stunning.

Can Public Radio Take Risks Again?

This has been an interesting time in public radio of late, and the next few years are going to test whether it’s capable of taking a risk enough to give an outlet to new ways of doing things.

Car Talk is gone, Keillor is retiring, Eichten has retired, and an increasing number of people who basically built public radio are turning things over to the next generation, which has not been well schooled in the art of betting it all on an idea..

[Via MPR News]

texaspublicradio:

ARTSLAM! Turns Visual Art into Performance
TPR’s Paul Flahive was at The White Rabbit this weekend covering ARTSLAM! a night where visual art turns into performance art as painters conceive, paint and sell their art in one evening. The theme this past Saturday night was “8-bit Arcade.” (Photo: Paul Flahive/TPR)

texaspublicradio:

ARTSLAM! Turns Visual Art into Performance

TPR’s Paul Flahive was at The White Rabbit this weekend covering ARTSLAM! a night where visual art turns into performance art as painters conceive, paint and sell their art in one evening. The theme this past Saturday night was “8-bit Arcade.” (Photo: Paul Flahive/TPR)

A Public Radio Pledge Drive Drinking Game

The goal: Get drunk enough to actually donate money to the station.

Drink every time:

  • Announcer explains how, even though St. Louis Public Radio is free to listen to, it’s not free, free
  • A morning host says how much Diane Rehm loves it when people from St. Louis call in to her show
  • Announcer mentions “driveway moments”
  • Ira Glass lays on the guilt trip, threatens to call you at home
  • Finish everything in your NPR mug if Ira Glass actually does call you at home, then retracts his previous guilt trip and apologizes
  • It’s mentioned that the station has just two fundraising campaigns a year rather than three, so you can enjoy more of its in-depth reporting about warlords and bees
  • Someone throws down a “challenge” to raise a wholly unrealistic sum of money before the end of the hour (i.e., $2,700 in the next twelve minutes)
  • Two drinks if the challenge is sponsored by a doctor or a law firm
  • Announcer notes that it costs $35 to become a member of St. Louis Public Radio, but many people choose to give more
  • Finish everything in your glass if announcer coolly suggests donating more than $100 a month
  • You hear the words “sustaining” or “cornerstone”
  • The number to call to make a donation, 314-516-4000, is said two or more times in a row
  • Chug every drop in your possession if an announcer tacks on the word “bitches,” as in, “Call 314-516-4000 to donate now, bitches!” and donate one year’s salary — winner!

[Via the Riverfront Times]

The ratio of risk-takers among the stakeholders is not high enough in public broadcasting to motivate significant change. The ratio can rise, however, if leaders act with that intention and take responsibility for bringing the outsiders into Public Broadcasting.

System leaders, middle managers and board members are eerily homogenous. Among them are the endangered species of public broadcasting: female CEOs and general managers, nonwhite program directors and talent, and people under the age of 40.
The lack of diversity in public broadcasting should be someone’s responsibility. Whose is it? Who gets fired when we fail on our public commitments to diversity?

It’s the people who don’t make it to the meetings who have the best ideas. If the system viewed itself from the bottom up, it would see with many more lenses and speak with many more voices. It would stand a better chance of stimulating creative destruction and true innovation.
To human rights advocates and those who have been doing the hard work of bringing attention to these kinds of labor issues for years, if my failures have made your jobs harder, I apologize. If I had done my job properly, with the skills I have honed for years, I could have avoided this. Instead, I blinded myself, and lost sight of the people I wanted most to help.
Mike Daisey

"When I said onstage that I had personally experienced things I in fact did not, I failed to honor the contract I’d established with my audiences over many years and many shows. In doing so, I not only violated their trust, I also made worse art."

Mike Daisey drops the eye-rolling “It’s not journalism, it’s THEATAH!” pretension and finally apologizes for being a lying liar who lies.

"When I said onstage that I had personally experienced things I in fact did not, I failed to honor the contract I’d established with my audiences over many years and many shows. In doing so, I not only violated their trust, I also made worse art."

Mike Daisey drops the eye-rolling “It’s not journalism, it’s THEATAH!” pretension and finally apologizes for being a lying liar who lies.